Getting started is easier than you think. Once you have been out and experienced the magic of flight with a Trial Introductory Flight, and decided that flying is for you, there are a few steps to take to get you on the way to earning your wings. To avoid unnecessary interruptions to your training, it is recommended that you take care of the following requirements as soon as practical once you have made the decision to learn to fly. Our team are happy to assist if you have any questions or require assistance to complete any of these steps.

ARN (Aviation Reference Number)

What is an ARN and why do I need one?

An ARN is an Aviation Reference Number. It is similar to an account number or customer number and it should be quoted whenever you call CASA. It is your own unique identifier. If you hold a licence or permission you will find in most cases that the number on the licence or permission is the ARN belonging to the entity that holds that licence or permission.

In most cases you will be able to apply for your ARN on the same application as your ASIC, however some circumstances will require an application to be completed at a different time.

ASIC CARD

To gain access to a security controlled airport, such as Cairns, you will need to apply for an ASIC (Aviation Security Identification Card).

Once you complete and submit the relevant paperwork, your application will undergo a series of checks, including a police check.

Once this process is complete and providing your application is successful, you should recieve your ASIC in the mail a few weeks later. Usually you will recieve a lanyard and card holder with your ASIC.

Once recieved, your ASIC must be worn at all times when you are airside at a security controlled airport.

AVIATION MEDICAL

You will also be required to undergo a medical examination by a CASA approved doctor. a DAME (Designated Aviation Medical Examiner) is a doctor who is approved by CASA to issue aviation medicals. The type of medical you require, is determined by the licence you are planning to achieve.

If you are training for a private pilot licence, you will need a Class 2 Medical, if you are training to commercial standard and beyond, you will need a Class 1 Medical, which is a more stringent check, and requires the applicant to visit an opthamologist.

In some circumstances you may qualify for a Drivers Licence Medical. this basically means that if you are fit to drive a car then you may be fit to fly an aircraft, there are limitations on this type of medical.